Battery life with music

BomberHQ
BomberHQ Registered Users Posts: 3
Apprentice Traveler
edited January 24 in TomTom Sports
I recently did a 3 hour run with GPS, heart rate and bluetooth music and the battery was virtually dead by the end of it (warnings). This was a Spark 3 Cardio + Music, but I also have a standard Spark 3 + Music, which I tested as having almost the same battery life.

Could others confirm 3 hours is about right for battery life with GPS & streaming music?

Im doing a marathon and I need to be sure I can track the run for at least 4 - 4.5 hours! Id like the option to listen to music, so worst case I'll take both watches and use one for music, the other for tracking ... defeats the object of a multi-function watch though!

Many thanks.

Comments

  • tfarabaugh
    tfarabaugh Posts: 16,943
    Superuser
    That is about the right life with all sensors and music playing (depends on how full the watch was when you started and how much you played with it during use). Battery life is rated for around 5 hours for GPS/HR/Music, 9 for GPS/HR, 11 for GPS only, 2 weeks for watch only (that includes pause time as the sensors are still on - so if during a 2 hour activity you had 30 minutes of pause it was 2:30 of battery life, not just the 2 hours it was recording for). Those of course are estimates and best case scenario and are impacted by usage (using backlight, switching screens, etc.) and environmental conditions (overcast skies, tree cover, tall buildings, etc.). If you have night mode or the backlight on that is going to impact it greatly. I have found that they are pretty accurate estimates and my usage and testing has pretty well matched them. Bear in mind that the battery gauge is a rough estimate at best and I have gone many hours when it indicates that it was almost empty. You may be able to get 4-4.5 hours with music if you have the backlight off and do not change screens at all, and are on a fully charged battery but it will be tight. You are better off leaving the music or HR off to ensure it makes it.

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question.
  • BomberHQ
    BomberHQ Registered Users Posts: 3
    Apprentice Traveler
    Many thanks for the reply. The run was continuous from a full battery at the start, and the watch is only a month old. Sync & backlight were manual/off.

    The music was playing the full 3 hours, as there is no way to connect / disconnect the headset during an activity. Im guessing just pausing the music would have no effect on the battery drain as the Bluetooth connection is still active.

    I bought the watch for the marathon, so Im pretty disappointed it doesnt get anywhere near its 5 hour claim.

    Other observations people should be aware of:
    • It took 4 or 5 attempts to get the watch to pair with my headsets (generic Chinese in-ear and over-ear), but once paired they connect every time.
    • The watch has to be on the correct wrist to connect and stay connected to the headset for music streaming i.e. line of sight to the headset electronics. No other Bluetooth device I have is this fussy (same headsets).
    • Activity sync via the Android App is super-flakey, but once synced, upload to Strava works perfectly.
    To end on a positive note, it has been a great watch for training and shorter runs. I had a Sony Smartwatch for a couple of years until the battery died (fabulous watch) and an Amazfit Pace for a few weeks (maybe the new Bip is better?). Apart from the extended battery life the Spark is simpler to use, works well and has a much more accurate GPS.
  • tfarabaugh
    tfarabaugh Posts: 16,943
    Superuser
    Pausing it greatly saves battery life as it is not actually transmitting a signal, which is the battery drain. Maintaining the BT connection is passive and uses little battery. the only issue is the headset may time out and turn off (depends on the unit) and once that happens you will not be able to start it again without ending the activity and restarting it.

    The times listed are best case with perfect atmospheric conditions, no GPS interference, you never changing the screen, etc.. This is the norm in the electronics industry, any times listed are best case and are not excepted in real world conditions. In my experience with the watch, take an hour off each time to be safe.

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question.