Heart rate monitor on Spark 3

Dany_Vi
Dany_Vi Registered Users Posts: 1
New Traveler
edited January 24 in TomTom Sports
179/5000
Good evening, I bought a runner 3 but the heart rate monitor does not read the beats .... The 2 lines continue to blink and that's enough. What should I do?
Many thanks in advance

Comments

  • tfarabaugh
    tfarabaugh Posts: 16,936
    Superuser
    Are you sure it is a Cardio model? Look under about in the menu and it will show the model name at the top, a cardio model will say Cardio. You can also look at the back of the watch to see if there are LEDs. If it is a Cardio model, go to Sensors in the menu and make sure Heart is set to On, not Off or External. if it is a Cardio model and the sensor is turned on and t is till not giving you a reading i would suggest that calling Customer Support to see what they can do. They are able to more deeply investigate and diagnose problems than we can here on the user forum. To get the number for Customer Support, go to tomtom.com/support, choose Contact at the bottom, select the service required and the product name and click Contact Customer Care and then Phone Us. It will give you the phone number for the country your account is registered under (this can be changed by clicking the flag icon in the bottom right corner of the screen).

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question.
  • fio
    fio Registered Users Posts: 2
    Apprentice Traveler
    I've the opposite problem: the bpm is not realistic. It seems too high: I'm 53 years old and according with my TomTom I should be often above 200bpm while running slow.
  • tfarabaugh
    tfarabaugh Posts: 16,936
    Superuser
    fio wrote:
    I've the opposite problem: the bpm is not realistic. It seems too high: I'm 53 years old and according with my TomTom I should be often above 200bpm while running slow.

    Spikes in HR are generally from poor blood flow producing weak pulse strength, so the watch reads cadence instead. This is most common in running and is particularly apparent early in a workout or during a non-intense workout when you are not warmed up. You have to think of the optical heart rate as an algorithm that is attempting to track a signal in a set frequency range (30-230 or whatever it uses). If the pulse signal is weak it latches onto the next strongest rhythmic signal, which is your cadence in running and the vibrations of the bike in cycling. For most people who experience this while running it spikes to around 180-200 bpm which is also the average cadence people run at. Additionally, each person has a different HR signal ‘strength’, depending on a range of factors, so some are prone to get it more than others. But usually their signal strength is lower for the first 5-10 minutes until they warm up properly. So in that time, it is prone to latching onto cadence, which is a common fault with all optical HRs, unfortunately. If you notice it while it happening you can try moving the watch a bit or briefly pausing your run so it loses the cadence reading and latches back onto HR, which I find usually corrects it. I generally pause the watch, stand still for 20-30 seconds and will see it immediately start to drop. Once it gets into a more reasonable range and the pulse reading stops dithering (dithering is when it is not getting a good signal and it is a lighter grey in color) I start up again and it stays true for the rest of the run. You can also try switching wrists and the position on the wrist. I find I got better readings on my right wrist over my left and some people find they get better readings if the watch is on the inside of the wrist rather than the outside. It also helps if you warm up a bit to get your blood moving and your HR up so it is producing a strong signal. Play around with it and see if any of this helps you. The challenge for the manufacturers of optical HRs (and this is a common issue with all brands, my Scosche also does it) is to figure out how to factor out the other "noise" that is overriding the pulse signal without also factoring out other important data.