Actual pace does not correspond to average pace — TomTom Community

Actual pace does not correspond to average pace

metasmetas Posts: 10 [Neophyte Traveler]
Dear all,
few times it happens that while running I am all the time checking the actual pace. Even if I am checking it all the time, my average pace on this distance is different. For example last time I was all the time 4:00-4:10 actual pace. But in summary I can see the average pace 4:22. What is wrong? How can I use the actual pace if it is completely different compare to average? Attached there are pictures from my last run. All the time I tried to run 4:00-4:10 what I was checking in actual pace on my watches while running. In app I can see it also on graph, but in summary there is 4:22. How can this be solved? otherwise actual pace is completely useless if it is not working properly.

Comments

  • tfarabaughtfarabaugh Posts: 16,676
    Superusers
    One of the moderators may be able to confirm, but I believe the graph is the raw watch data without any smoothing or processing, while the totals in the summary have been smoothed (it goes through and pulls out bad data and makes corrections), so the paces will be different. The graph will represent what you saw on the watch face and is accurate.

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question.
  • metasmetas Posts: 10 [Neophyte Traveler]
    Thanks tfarabaugh for your comment. But the value which I can see in summary (4:22 in this case) I can see also on watches while running in AVG pace. But yes, it makes sense what you wrote that in actual pace there are raw data. Then it is quite confusing. Another thing is, if we are running with my wife together she as the same model as I have (TT runner with the same SW version) she can see different actual pace than I can.
  • tfarabaughtfarabaugh Posts: 16,676
    Superusers
    The difference with your wife's watch is is totally normal. The nature of consumer grade GPS is that each data point collected is only accurate to within 15m-30m of your actual location. The watch collects the data points and then tries to figure out a route using them (considering that some points may overlap or duplicate) and a corresponding speed. The watch then smooths the data to come up with the most reasonable route taken according to the algorithm it is programmed with. This is why every watch, even two of the same model, will come up with different distances and speeds, as they are collecting different GPS data. And even though you think you are running steadily you may be varying more than you think or it could be the GPS points are bouncing all around you so it thinks your pace is changing. For example if one GPS point is actually 20m behind you and the next one (collected a second later) is 20m in front of you, it is going to think you sped up to close the gap. In the same way if you reverse this it will think you slowed down. The smoothing algorithms attempt to clear up as much of this as possible but it is not an exact science.

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question.
  • metasmetas Posts: 10 [Neophyte Traveler]
    Tfarabaugh:
    The difference with your wife's watch is is totally normal. The nature of consumer grade GPS is that each data point collected is only accurate to within 15m-30m of your actual location. The watch collects the data points and then tries to figure out a route using them (considering that some points may overlap or duplicate) and a corresponding speed. The watch then smooths the data to come up with the most reasonable route taken according to the algorithm it is programmed with. This is why every watch, even two of the same model, will come up with different distances and speeds, as they are collecting different GPS data. And even though you think you are running steadily you may be varying more than you think or it could be the GPS points are bouncing all around you so it thinks your pace is changing. For example if one GPS point is actually 20m behind you and the next one (collected a second later) is 20m in front of you, it is going to think you sped up to close the gap. In the same way if you reverse this it will think you slowed down. The smoothing algorithms attempt to clear up as much of this as possible but it is not an exact science.

    I hope this helped answer your question. If so, please mark it as a solution so others can look for it if they have the same question
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